Christmas Gifts for Sailors

blm-xmas-nautical-wordpres

Searching for that perfect nautical gift this year? Whether you’re buying for a seasoned skipper or armchair sailor, we’ve got Christmas covered. Take a look at just a few of this year’s Christmas picks, then shop the sale where all our books are 45% off!*

* Sale ends Sunday 11 December 2016, excludes Reeds Nautical Almanacs

gift-banner

9781472918857A History of Sailing in 100 Objects
£20.00 £11.00

Which civilisation first took to water in small craft? Who worked out how to measure distance at sea? Why did the humble lemon rise to such prominence in the diets of sailors? A quirky look at history through one hundred objects that changed the way we sail.

Shop now >>


9781844863143The Sea Chart
£25.00 £13.75

To sail the oceans needed skill as well as courage, and the sea chart was the tool by which ships navigated their course. This magnificent book looks at the history of the chart and nautical map as a means of safe navigation.

Shop now >>


9781472922786Des Pawson’s Knot Craft and Rope Mats
£16.99 £9.34

Knotting guru Des Pawson gives step-by-step
instructions on how to put together beautiful rope
designs.

Shop now >>


9781472927088Narrowboat Life
£18.99 £10.44

Filled with beautiful, enthralling photography, Narrowboat Life answers all the questions we’ve wanted to ask about the ins and outs of living on the inland waterways.

Shop now >>


Click here to find all our gift books at 45% off


br-banner

9781472916730Gordon Bennett and the First Yacht Race Across the Atlantic
£16.99 £9.34

The result of a drunken bet between three rich 19th century Americans, the first race across the Atlantic would change the course of yachting history and leave six sailors dead…

“A jaunty and surprise-packed retelling of a wonderful story” Times Literary Supplement

Shop now >>


9781472936004.jpgIn the Wake of Heroes: Sailing’s Greatest Stories
Introduced by Tom Cunliffe
£8.99 £4.94

A collection of amazing stories of great seamanship, bringing together some of the best sailing accounts from the last few centuries. Renowned sailor Tom Cunliffe introduces each extract by giving insightful background on the writer, their book and what makes their experience so worth reading.

Shop now >>


9781472908841Sea Fever: The True Adventures that Inspired our Greatest Maritime Authors, from Conrad to Masefield, Melville and Hemingway
£8.99 £4.94

This enthralling book takes us on a tour of the most dangerous, exciting and often eccentric escapades of literature’s sailing stars, and how these true stories inspired and informed their best-loved works.

Shop now >>


9781472928320Untie the Lines: Setting Sail and Breaking Free
£8.99 £4.94

Former stressed-out city girl Emma is in Malaysia, living on a yacht with handsome Guy, with plans to explore the world’s most remote and exotic places. Life couldn’t be more perfect. But when she is eventually forced to return to her old life in London, Emma finds herself struggling with anxiety and panic attacks. Running, or sailing, away is just not an option any more.

Shop now>>


For big savings on all our bunkside reads, head to www.adlardcoles.com


practical-banner

9781472935342The Pacific Crossing Guide 3rd edition
RCC Pilotage Foundation
£50.00 £27.50

A complete reference for anyone contemplating sailing the Pacific in their own boat. From ideal timing, suitable boats, routes, methods of communication, to seasonal weather, likely costs and dangers, the comprehensiveness of this book will both inspire dreamers and instil confidence in those about to depart.

Shop now >>


9781472918130The Complete Ocean Skipper: Deep-water Voyaging, Navigation and Yacht Management
£30.00 £16.50

The Complete Ocean Skipper covers everything a yachtsman needs to know when planning an offshore cruise or ocean passage.

“Essential reading for anyone planning for or dreaming about sailing long distances” Soundings

Shop now >>


9781472923196Heavy Weather Sailing 7th edition
£35.00 £19.25

For 50 years Heavy Weather Sailing has been regarded as the ultimate international authority on surviving storms at sea aboard sailing and motor vessels. This is the seventh updated edition, ensuring that in its 50th year the book remains as relevant and as essential as it has been for the previous five decades

Shop now >>


9781472923202Splicing Modern Ropes: A Practical Handbook
£20.00 £11.00

For any seafarer, splicing rope is an essential skill. But the traditional 3-strand rope is fast disappearing. So how do you splice braided rope? This is the definitive guide to this crucial skill. Most of the techniques are quite easy to master – and they are also fun to do!

Shop now >>

 


Click here for course books, cruising guides, maintenance manuals and more – all 45% off!


mh-banner

9781844864096Britain’s Historic Ships
£20.00 £11.00

The British Isles have a long, rich seafaring history stretching from the earliest times through the victories of Drake and Nelson, the voyages of discovery of Cabot and Cook and the defence of the realm by vessels in the present century. This lavish book explores twenty of the most celebrated ships in Britain.

Shop now >>


9781472930804Tom Diaper’s Logbook: Memoirs of a Racing Skipper
£16.99 £9.34

Tom Diaper’s memoirs, written on scraps of old cigarette papers, tell of dramatic races with the German Kaiser, working for the Pinkerton Detective Agency, both World Wars and other exciting adventures during Tom’s lifetime. This is a rare opportunity to read first-hand about the drama, conflict and fascinating details that made up the life of a for-hire racing skipper during the glory days of racing.

Shop now >>


9781844862344Cutty Sark: The Last of the Tea Clippers
£20.00 £11.00

A beautiful volume describing the eventful history of one of the world’s most celebrated ships – from her construction at Dumbarton in 1869, her famous tea voyages, through to a career under a Portuguese flag and subsequent return to the Thames, the dramatic fire, painstaking restoration and glorious reopening.

Shop now >>


9781844862894Captain of the Carpathia: The Seafaring Life of Titanic Hero Sir Arthur Henry Rostron
£20.00 £11.00

Henry Arthur Rostron was the captain of Carpathia, the first ship to reach the distressed Titanic, defying the ship’s limitations to rescue 706 survivors. Following the rescue Rostron became the most celebrated master mariner of his generation.

Shop now >>

 


Browse our full collection of maritime history & save a festive 45%!



Merry Christmas from Adlard Coles!

Pets Onboard

There has recently been a welcome addition to my family – Bob the West Highland Terrier, and this has led me to thinking about how he would cope onboard our boat.

Of course my first consideration was a doggy life jacket, he would definitely look adorable in need one of those.

Image

They are available to buy in all different sizes, as well as a whole array of nautical fashion accessories for your pampered pooch.

But realistically, is taking your pet onboard really a good idea?

The answer is absolutely, I know Bob much prefers accompanying the family anywhere rather than staying at home. However, there are things to take into consideration before setting sail:

  • Just like humans, dogs and cats might take a while to find their sea legs, and sea sickness can be a problem. There are many natural remedies that can be used to ease the problem, have a browse through Adlard Coles’ Fast Fixes for your Boat for some helpful tips, or alternatively ask your vet for some advice.
  • If your dog or cat is trained to use the litter box, toilet calls should not be a problem. If not, remember to monitor what your animal is drinking and take regular trips to land to avoid accidents.
  • If the weather is sunny and hot, be sure to keep an eye on your pet. As much as animals love sunbathing, it can cause heat stroke, so try to keep them shaded and drinking plenty. Also, fibreglass boats can get extremely hot in direct sunlight, so make sure your pet doesn’t burn his/her paws.
Image

Fast Fixes for your Boat is full of helpful tips on how to make sure your boat is pet proof

But for those of us who are more superstitious – isn’t it bad luck to take your dog or cat onboard?

The rule used to be that any animal not at home at sea was bad luck on board. According to Adlard Coles’ Don’t Shoot the Albatross by Jonathan Eyers, the rule that black cats are unlucky on land is reversed at sea, and white cats are the unlucky ones. Although a single white hair plucked from a black cat is lucky…Image

Over the years these superstitions have been proven to be untrue, with dogs and cats playing an important role in naval history.  Here are some of the most famous furry nautical heroes:

Unsinkable Sam

One of the most famous mascots of the British Royal Navy, Unsinkable Sam was the ship’s cat aboard the German battleship Bismarck. Unfortunately the ship sunk in 1941, and out of 2,200 crew only 116 survived, plus Sam. Sam was picked up by the destroyer HMS Cossack, this was also torpedoed and sunk a few months later, killing 159 of her crew. Still Sam survived. He then became the ship’s cat on the HMS Ark Royal … which was torpedoed and sunk in November of that year. Sam was rescued once again, but it was decided that it was time for Sam’s seafaring to come to an end.

Unsinkable Sam was given a new job as mouser-in-residence at the governor general of Gibraltar’s office. He eventually returned to the U.K. and lived out his years at the Home for Sailors.

This story doesn’t bode well for cats on boats, it has to be said. But then there was Simon…

Simon

Image

Simon was the celebrated ship’s cat of HMS Amethyst. Simon was aboard the ship during the Yangtze Incident in 1949 and was wounded in the bombardment that killed 25 crew members, including the commanding officer.

Simon recovered and resumed his rat-hunting duties, as well as keeping up the crew’s morale. He was appointed to the rank of able sea cat. ‘Simon’s company and expertise as a rat-catcher were invaluable during the months we were held captive,’ said Commander Stuart Hett. ‘During a terrifying time, he helped boost the morale of many young sailors, some of whom had seen their friends killed. Simon is still remembered with great affection.’

When Simon later died of an infection, tributes poured in and his obituary appeared in The Times. He was posthumously awarded the Dickin Medal for bravery (the Victoria Cross for animals) and was buried with full naval honors.

Judy

ImageJudy was the ship’s dog on board HMS Gnat and HMS Grasshopper before and during World War II. Not only did she save the lives of many crew members when Grasshopper sank, but she was also the only dog to be registered as a prisoner-of-war when they were captured by the Japanese. It was here that Judy was adopted by Frank Williams, who shared his daily ration of rice with her. In return Judy did her utmost to protect the crew, intervening when the guards were administering punishment and alerting them to the approach of danger from guards or hostile wildlife.

When the crew were moved to Singapore Williams smuggled Judy along, training her to sit absolutely still in a rice bag. However, the ship was torpedoed and Williams was forced to push her overboard in an attempt to save her life.

Luckily Williams survived, but was unsure if his companion had been so lucky. Tales started to emerge of a dog helping crew members to floating debris as the ship sank and thankfully Williams and Judy were reunited. However, Judy had one more hardship to endure when the guards got fed up of her and sentenced her to death. She managed to survive by hiding in the jungle and hunting for food.

After the war Judy lived out the rest of her days with Williams and was awarded the Dickin Medal. Her citation reads:

‘For magnificent courage and endurance in Japanese prison camps which helped to maintain morale among her fellow prisoners and also for saving many lives through her intelligence and watchfulness’

Williams was also awarded the PDSA White Cross of St Giles for his devotion to Judy.

Whilst I can’t see Bob dragging us to safety if our boat sank, I think the family will definitely feel better with him there, and I can’t wait to see him sat on the boat in his little life-jacket.

Image

Bob the West Highland Terrier

Ten films that float our boat

Guest blog by ArrJimLad

Tired of being stuck ashore? Restless to get out on the ocean waves?

Here at Adlard Coles, understanding seamen that we are, we know how fighting the urge to hoist anchor can sometimes seem unbearable. Fear not though, help is at hand…

We’ve put our heads together to compile an absolutely non-definitive list of sea-themed films for you to trawl through – a veritable life raft for those of you unsure of being able to cope without the water’s ebb and flow until you’ve spoken to your boss and booked some time off work.

There are, of course, dozens that didn’t make the cut (some rather controversially, although few tears were shed over some of the other omissions) but that’s where you come in. If you’ve got your own take on things, if you think we’ve got it wrong or you just downright disagree, feel free to post any of your thoughts below. Right, let the debate begin!

*

10. Titanic

Let’s get this one out of the way first, shall we? Yes, we know it’s not cool. Yes, we know it’s received more than its fair share of press this year. And yes, we know its existence comes hand in hand with Celine Dion going on and on… but all of that, dear cynics, would mean overlooking a few bare-faced facts.

Made directly before James Cameron holed himself away to create Avatar, on its initial release Titanic did the following: earned over $600 million at the US box office; launched Leonardo DiCaprio and Kate Winslet onto the A-list; and possessed some genuinely (and under-rated) spectacular special effect sequences that left audience jaws on cinema floors.

Yet, beyond all of the Oscars, tears and an ability to put bums on seats, arguably Titanic’s greatest achievement is that it has continually managed to capture the imaginations of a worldwide audience on a scale rarely encountered before. And for that reason alone, it’s got to be on our list.

9. The Little Mermaid

It’s easy to forget that in the few years leading up to Pixar’s game-changing computer animation hitting our cinema screens, Disney were producing smash-hit traditionally animated films that captured the imagination of audiences all over the world.

The Little Mermaid is as bright, colourful and, dare I say it, twee as you’d imagine, but it would be ludicrous not to acknowledge its standing as a firm family (and office!) favourite responsible for taking generations under the sea for the very first time.

8. Das Boot

I haven’t seen this. People in the office tell me I should. That is all.

7. Jaws

Understandably criticised by marine biologists and shark enthusiasts the world over for demonising one of nature’s greatest surviving predators, but it’s impossible for this almost entirely sea-based film NOT to make our list.

Adapted from Peter Benchley’s novel, Jaws was Steven Spielberg’s big screen breakthrough and was directed on a smidgen of the astronomical budgets his productions now command. Assisted by John Williams’ iconic score, Spielberg creates a Hitchcock-like thriller-horror via clever use of underwater camera shots which left audiences lifting their feet onto their chairs in fear of being gnawed on by an eternally hungry great white shark which, for the vast majority of the film, remains unseen.

That said fish actually turns out to be quite a turgid rubber-tyre of a creation when you get a closer look at it matters not; packed with classic cinematic moments, Jaws deserves its inclusion.

6. Master and Commander

Now to a film lauded for its accuracy. Starring Russell Crowe and Paul Bettany, Master and Commander (based on the novels of Patrick O’Brian) raked in ten Oscar nominations and countless plaudits from the critics. As gnarled and gritty as you’d expect the Napoleonic Wars to have been, this epic portrayal of soldiers’ lives at sea during the early 1800s comes with humanity, but isn’t for the faint of heart.

5. Adventures of Robinson Crusoe

Not technically sea-based for the majority, but it’s difficult not to mention a film that comes loaded with the idea of the ocean’s supremacy and how it can, if it so wishes, leave one at its mercy.

Actor Dan O’Herlihy received an Oscar nomination for his interpretation of Daniel Defoe’s most famous character in a story that has inspired countless other productions to employ the ocean’s strength as a means of throwing characters into seemingly unassailable, despairing situations.

4. March of the Penguins

Not since The Shawshank Redemption has Morgan Freeman put his silky smooth Tennessee voice to better use. Freeman narrates the English version (the original documentary is in French) of a stirring story of the annual hardships the emperor penguins of Antarctica must face in order to mate.

There has, of course been other successful sea-life-based schmaltz on our cinema screens over the years, but March of the Penguins trumps them all because, not only does it manage to tick the ‘oh sooo cute!’ and ‘heart-warming romance’ boxes, but because it’s real.

Take that, Keiko.

3. 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea

It’d be difficult not to include a submarine-based film on our list, so we’ve gone for a classic. Other films might lay claim to being tense, successful sub-based thrillers in their own right, but the impact of 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea had on its audience shouldn’t go underestimated.

An adventure based on Jules Verne’s novel, it has become regarded as one of Disney’s classic non-cartoon productions which, alongside adding greater intrigue into the wonders of the sea, also brought about a terrifying monster of the deep onto our screens.

2. Treasure Island

Back when Johnny Depp was still in short trousers little could he have known how his bank balance would prosper from a story to which all other pirate adventures owe their pieces of eight.

Jim Hawkins, Billy Bones, Long John Silver, yo-ho-ho, fifteen men on a dead man’s chest, parrots, wooden legs and bottles of rum… this film adaptation of Robert Louis Stevenson’s classic novel is the cinematic blueprint for every pirate who’s sailed the seas ever since.

1. Finding Nemo

The Little Mermaid looked spectacular on its release but the animation seems stone-age in comparison with this, a sensory overload that’s, arguably, Pixar Studios’ greatest work.

By deciding to cater for the adults of the children clamouring to see their films, Pixar’s productions are known not just for their heart, but for their intelligence too, and Finding Nemo is no exception (for example, how many average 5 / 45 year-olds knew about anemones or the EAC before Nemo and Dory showed them?). A production that makes you want to go out and explore for yourself what the depths of the ocean have to offer, this masterpiece deservedly floats to the number one spot on our list.

*